Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Resources

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  • Audio Book
  • Book

by Ibram X. Kendi  

"The National Book Award winning history of how racist ideas were created, spread, and deeply rooted in American society."

  • Audio Book
  • Book

by Robin DiAngelo

"The New York Times best-selling book exploring the counterproductive reactions white people have when their assumptions about race are challenged, and how these reactions maintain racial inequality."

  • Book

by Debby Irving

"In Waking Up White, Irving tells her often cringe-worthy story with such openness that readers will turn every page rooting for her-and ultimately for all of us."

  • Podcast

Apple Podcasts (11 Episodes) 

"Over 80% of teachers in the U.S. are white. But most don’t know that their whiteness matters. TWW seeks to move the conversation forward on how to be consciously, intentionally, anti-racist in the classroom. Because 'white' does not mean a blank slate. . . . 

  • Podcast

Wesley Morris and Jenna Wortham
The New York Times Podcast

"Step inside the confession booth of Wesley Morris and Jenna Wortham, two culture writers for The New York Times. They devour TV, movies, art, music and the internet to find the things that move them — to tears, awe and anger. Still Processing is where they try to understand the pleasures and pathologies of America in 2020.

  • Podcast

Dan Harris 
Episode 254 — White People Talking about Whiteness

Host Dan Harris interviews Eleanor Hancock, "who is the Executive Director of a group called White Awake, which employs 'educational resources and spiritual practices' to engage white people 'in the creation of a just and sustainable society.'”

  • Documentary

Directed by Ava DuVernay 
Netflix 

“Powerful, infuriating... Ava DuVernay’s documentary ‘13TH' will get your blood boiling… Electrifying.” — The New York Times

  • Miniseries

Directed by Ava DuVernay
Netflix 

"When They See Us is based on events of the 1989 Central Park jogger case and explores the lives and families of the five male suspects who were falsely accused then prosecuted on charges related to the rape and assault of a woman in Central Park, New York City."

  • Audio Book
  • Book
 

by Ijeoma Oluo

"In this New York Times bestseller, Ijeoma Oluo offers a hard-hitting but user-friendly examination of race in America."

  • Audio Book
  • Book


by Crystal Marie Fleming

"A unique and irreverent take on everything that's wrong with our "national conversation about race"--and what to do about it"

  • TED Talk
  • Video

by Kimberlé Crenshaw

"In this moving talk, [Kimberlé Crenshaw] calls on us to bear witness to this reality and speak up for victims of prejudice."

  • Book

by Edward E. Baptist

"Told through intimate slave narratives, plantation records, newspapers, and the words of politicians, entrepreneurs, and escaped slaves, The Half Has Never Been Told offers a radical new interpretation of American history."

  • TED Talk
  • Video

by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

In this powerful TED Talk, Adichie compellingly underscores the pitfalls of reducing any one person to a single narrative.

  • Book

by John Palfrey

"In Safe Spaces, Brave Spaces, John Palfrey argues that the essential democratic values of diversity and free expression can, and should, coexist on campus."

  • Book

By Carol Anderson

"From the Civil War to our combustible present, White Rage reframes our continuing conversation about race, chronicling the powerful forces opposed to black progress in America--now in paperback with a new afterword by the author, acclaimed historian Carol Anderson."

  • Article

by Ibram X. Kendi

The Atlantic

July 23, 2020

In this essay, Kendi underscores the urgency of dismantling racist and white supremacist policies in his reflection on the late Representative John Lewis and his consistent rejection of calls for patience in regards to securing freedom.  

  • Book

by Reni Eddo Lodge

"Award-winning journalist Reni Eddo-Lodge was frustrated with the way that discussions of race and racism are so often led by those blind to it, by those willfully ignorant of its legacy. Her response, Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race, has transformed the conversation both in Britain and around the world."

  • Audio Book
  • Book

by Margaret A. Hagerman

"American kids are living in a world of ongoing public debates about race, daily displays of racial injustice, and for some, an increased awareness surrounding diversity and inclusion. In this heated context, sociologist Margaret A. Hagerman zeroes in on affluent, white kids to observe how they make sense of privilege, unequal educational opportunities, and police violence. In fascinating detail, Hagerman considers the role that they and their families play in the reproduction of racism and racial inequality in America."

  • Audio Book
  • Book

by Shamus Rahman Khan

"As one of the most prestigious high schools in the nation, St. Paul's School in Concord, New Hampshire, has long been the exclusive domain of America's wealthiest sons. But times have changed. Today, a new elite of boys and girls is being molded at St. Paul's, one that reflects the hope of openness but also the persistence of inequality."

 

  • Audio Book
  • Book

by Ta-Nehisi Coates

"We Were Eight Years in Power features Coates's iconic essays first published in The Atlantic, including "Fear of a Black President," "The Case for Reparations," and "The Black Family in the Age of Mass Incarceration," along with eight fresh essays that revisit each year of the Obama administration through Coates's own experiences, observations, and intellectual development, capped by a bracingly original assessment of the election that fully illuminated the tragedy of the Obama era. We Were Eight Years in Power is a vital account of modern America, from one of the definitive voices of this historic moment."

  • Book

by Randall Kennedy

"With a range of reference that extends from the Jim Crow south to Chris Rock routines and the O. J. Simpson trial, Kennedy takes on not just a word, but our laws, attitudes, and culture with bracing courage and intelligence."

  • Audio Book
  • Book

by Anthony Jack

"Getting in is only half the battle. The Privileged Poor reveals how--and why--disadvantaged students struggle at elite colleges, and explains what schools can do differently if these students are to thrive.

If we truly want our top colleges to be engines of opportunity, university policies and campus cultures will have to change. Jack provides concrete advice to help schools reduce these hidden disadvantages--advice we cannot afford to ignore."

  • Audio Book
  • Book

by Ibram X. Kendi

"Kendi weaves an electrifying combination of ethics, history, law, and science with his own personal story of awakening to antiracism. This is an essential work for anyone who wants to go beyond the awareness of racism to the next step: contributing to the formation of a just and equitable society."

by Eddie Moore and Ali Michael

"Schools that routinely fail Black boys are not extraordinary. In fact, they are all-too ordinary. If we are to succeed in positively shifting outcomes for Black boys and young men, we must first change the way school is "done." That's where the eight in ten teachers who are White women fit in . . . and this urgently needed resource is written specifically for them as a way to help them understand, respect and connect with all of their students."

  • Audio Book
  • Book

by Austin Channing Brown

"For readers who have engaged with America's legacy on race through the writing of Ta-Nehisi Coates and Michael Eric Dyson, I'm Still Here is an illuminating look at how white, middle-class, Evangelicalism has participated in an era of rising racial hostility, inviting the reader to confront apathy, recognize God's ongoing work in the world, and discover how blackness--if we let it--can save us all."

  • Podcast

"What if schools are doing exactly what they were meant to do? What if they were designed to only educate the elite few? Warning: This episode contains swearing, which, given the topic, feels appropriate."

  • Blog

by Afrika Afeni Mills

"The dominant culture in the United States is not only racist, it also tries to suppress conversations on race. 'There are numerous reasons for this, most of them related to the maintenance of the power status quo,' Afrika Afeni Mills writes. 'I’m asking you to help break this damaging practice — especially among adults in your school.'"

  • Audio Book
  • Book

by Richard Rothstein

"Through extraordinary revelations and extensive research that Ta-Nehisi Coates has lauded as "brilliant" (The Atlantic), Rothstein comes to chronicle nothing less than an untold story that begins in the 1920s, showing how this process of de jure segregation began with explicit racial zoning, as millions of African Americans moved in a great historical migration from the south to the north."

  • TED Talk
  • Video

by Dr. Elizabeth Stordeur Pryor

"In this TED Talk, Smith College historian Elizabeth Stordeur Pryor leads a thoughtful and history-backed examination of one of the most divisive words in the English language: the N-word."

  • Blog

by Derisa Grant

"Framing discussions as such [difficult conversations] further marginalizes diverse students by labeling them as promoting identity politics when, in fact, all course content reflects identity politicsargues Derisa Grant."

  • Book

by Eve L. Ewing

"Rooting her exploration in the historic African American neighborhood of Bronzeville, Ewing reveals that this issue is about much more than just schools. Black communities see the closing of their schools--schools that are certainly less than perfect but that are theirs--as one more in a long line of racist policies."

  • Book

by Susan Neiman

"As an increasingly polarized America fights over the legacy of racism, Susan Neiman, author of the contemporary philosophical classic Evil in Modern Thought, asks what we can learn from the Germans about confronting the evils of the past."

  • Book

by Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

"An essential tour through one of America's fundamental historical tragedies, Stony the Road is also a story of heroic resistance, as figures such as W. E. B. Du Bois and Ida B. Wells fought to create a counter-narrative, and culture, inside the lion's mouth. As sobering as this tale is, it also has within it the inspiration that comes with encountering the hopes our ancestors advanced against the longest odds."

  • Book

by Isabel Wilkerson

"Both a riveting microcosm and a major assessment, The Warmth of Other Suns is a bold, remarkable, and riveting work, a superb account of an "unrecognized immigration" within our own land. Through the breadth of its narrative, the beauty of the writing, the depth of its research, and the fullness of the people and lives portrayed herein, this book is destined to become a classic."

  • Book

by Viet Thanh Nguyen

"All wars are fought twice, the first time on the battlefield, the second time in memory. From the author of the Pulitzer Prize–winning novel The Sympathizer comes a searching exploration of the conflict Americans call the Vietnam War and Vietnamese call the American War—a conflict that lives on in the collective memory of both nations."

  • Book

by Cathy Park Hong

"With sly humor and a poet's searching mind, Hong uses her own story as a portal into a deeper examination of racial consciousness in America today. This intimate and devastating book traces her relationship to the English language, to shame and depression, to poetry and female friendship."

  • Article

by Nikole Hannah-Jones

New York Times Magazine

June 30, 2020

"Nikole Hannah-Jones is a staff writer for the magazine. In 2020, she won the Pulitzer Prize for commentary for her essay about black Americans and democracy. She is the creator of The 1619 Project, which won the National Magazine Award for public interest and a George Polk special award this year. She is also a 2017 MacArthur fellow."

  • Podcast

NPR Code Switch

"This year, Pride Month intersects with a surge of protests against racism and police brutality. So this week, courtesy of The Nod podcast, we're looking back at the life of Storme DeLarverie — a Black butch woman who didn't pull any punches when it came to protecting her community from violence."

  • Podcast

NPR Code Switch

"An overwhelming majority of people in Puerto Rico check "white" on the U.S. census, revealing a lot about Puerto Rico's relationship with race, colonialism and the United States."

  • Book

by Jason Reynolds and Ibram X. Kendi

"Through a gripping, fast-paced, and energizing narrative written by beloved award-winner Jason Reynolds, this book shines a light on the many insidious forms of racist ideas--and on ways readers can identify and stamp out racist thoughts in their daily lives."

  • Article

by John McWhorter

The Atlantic

December 23, 2019

"New words stick when they come from below, and respond to a real need."

  • Webinar

by Lauren Lake, Private School Village

"Join PSV Parent Ambassador Lauren Lake as she moderates a virtual discussion about the power of language with Dr. Jamila Lyiscott (Author, Black Appetite. White Food,  Assistant Professor of Social-Justice Education at UMass Amherst and a Senior Research Fellow of Teachers College, Columbia University's Institute for Urban and Minority Education).

  • Webinar

by Lauren Lake, Private School Village

"PSV Parent Ambassador Lauren Lake moderates a virtual discussion with Dr. Elizabeth Stordeur Pryor (Associate Professor of History at Smith College, Smith College Sherrerd Center Teaching Mentor for Equitable and Inclusive Pedagogies, and Author, Colored Travelers: Mobility and The Fight for Citizenship before the Civil War) and Dr. Neal A. Lester (Foundation Professor of English and Founding Director of Project Humanities at Arizona State University). A national voice on issues related to the N word and American race relations, Dr. Lester created and taught the first undergraduate course on the N word in the country."

  • TED Talk

by Dr. Jamila Lyiscott

"Viral TED speaker, spoken word poet, and social justice education scholar Dr. Jamila Lyiscott makes a powerful argument that, to honor and legitimize all students, we must, likewise, legitimize and honor all of their varied forms of written and spoken discourse, practicing "Liberation Literacies" in the classroom."

  • Podcast

Goop

Host Elise Loehnen interviews social psychologist Jennifer Eberhardt, Ph.D., author of Biased, about her research on prejudice and ways of addressing it.

  • Article

by Stephanie Woodard

In These Times

October 17, 2016

"Native Americans are being killed at a higher rate than any other group in the country -- but these deaths are rarely covered in the media.  Now, Native groups are organizing for justice in a growing Native Lives Matter movement."

  • Article

Native News Online

June 10, 2020

"In the aftermath of George Floyd’s death at the hands of Minneapolis police officers, Americans, young and old, in big cities and small towns, and of all colors have shown solidarity with the Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement. Joining in to show support and solidarity have been American Indians and Alaska Natives throughout Indian Country."

  • Article

by Michael Shulman

NY Times 

January 9, 2013

"If the gay-rights movement today seems to revolve around same-sex marriage, this generation is seeking something more radical: an upending of gender roles beyond the binary of male/female. The core question isn’t whom they love, but who they are — that is, identity as distinct from sexual orientation.

But what to call this movement? Whereas 'gay and lesbian' was once used to lump together various sexual minorities — and more recently 'L.G.B.T' to include bisexual and transgender — the new vanguard wants a broader, more inclusive abbreviation."

  • Article

by Dannielle Owens-Reid and Kristin Russo

Cosmopolitan

February 17, 2014

"On Feb. 13, 2014, Facebook introduced over 50 new terms for users to select from when identifying their gender. While before users had the choice of 'male' or 'female,' with the option of not answering or keeping their gender private, there is now an expansive "custom" gender section."

  • Podcast

NPR Code Switch

"After his daughter's racist and anti-LGBTQ social media posts became public, an Arab-Muslim entrepreneur is fighting to keep his once-burgeoning business alive in the middle of a national — and personal — reckoning with anti-blackness."

  • Podcast

NPR Code Switch

"At a Black Lives Matter protest in Los Angeles, a young Korean American man named Edmond Hong decided to grab a megaphone. Addressing other Asian Americans in the crowd, he described the need to stop being quiet and complacent in the fight against racism. On this episode, we talk to Edmond about why he decided to speak out. And we check in with a historian about why so many people mistakenly believe that Asian Americans aren't political."

 

  • Article

by Arundhati Roy

Financial Times

April 3, 2020

"The novelist on how coronavirus threatens India — and what the country, and the world, should do next."

  • Article

by Trynia Kaufman, MS

"Positive student relationships are fundamental to success. When students feel supported, they’re more likely to engage in learning and have better academic outcomes. Plus, when students have positive interactions with teachers, they have fewer behavioral problems. These relationships are more important—and more challenging—than ever in uncertain times, like during the coronavirus pandemic."

  • Webinar
  • Website

CHADD

The CHADD website serves as a clearinghouse for information and resources for children and adults living with Attention Deficit Disorder/Hyperactivity Disorder.

  • Article

by The Understood Team

"When a student has an Individualized Education Program (IEP) or a 504 Plan, you’ll likely hear the word accommodation. You may also hear school staff members say modification. While the two words sound similar, they mean different things.

An accommodation changes how a student learns the material. A modification changes what a student is taught or expected to learn. Here is a chart that explains the differences."

  • Article

Center for Parent Information and Resources

Feb. 8, 2020

"It is not always obvious what adaptations, accommodations, or modifications would be beneficial for a particular student, or how changes to the curriculum, its presentation, the classroom setting, or student evaluation might be made. This page is intended to help teachers and others find information that can guide them in making appropriate changes in the classroom based on what their students need."

  • Article

by Lee Ann Jung

An Educational Leadership Special Report | Volume 77
A New Reality: Getting Remote Learning Right Pages 16-21

"To support students with IEPs during school shutdowns, educators need careful coordination and a focus on what matters most."

  • Article

by s.e. smith

Catapult Magazine

July 28, 2020

"This is An Unquiet Mind, a National Magazine Award-winning monthly column by s.e. smith that explores disability identity and its interaction with the world at large."

  • Article

by s.e. smith

Catapult Magazine

February 05, 2020

"Here’s a thing about being labeled “smart” as a kid: When there’s a thing you’re not good at, people assume it is because you are lazy.

  • Article

by Abigail Abrams

Time Magazine

June 25, 2020

"There is no reliable national database tracking how many people with disabilities, or who are experiencing episodes of mental illness, are shot by police each year, but studies show that the numbers are substantial—likely between one-third and one-half of total police killings. And in the renewed national debate over racial injustice sparked by George Floyd’s killing at the hands of a Minneapolis police officer in May, those deaths should loom large."

  • Article

by Abigail Abrams

Time Magazine

July 23, 2020

"Judy Heumann remembers the day she went to register for kindergarten in 1952. She’d gotten dressed up and her mother had pulled her wheelchair up a flight of stairs before the principal intervened. Her disability, he said, meant she was not allowed to attend the school. Heumann had polio as a child, and it left her legs paralyzed and limited her use of her hands and arms. Throughout her time in the educational system, and after she graduated and became a teacher and activist, she had to fight for access at every turn."

  • Book

by Amir Hussain

"There has never been an America without Muslims"―so begins Amir Hussain, one of the most important scholars and teachers of Islam in America. Hussain, who is himself an American Muslim, contends that Muslims played an essential role in the creation and cultivation of the United States."

  • Book

by Carl W. Ernst

"Avoiding the traps of sensational political exposes and specialized scholarly Orientalism, Carl Ernst introduces readers to the profound spiritual resources of Islam while clarifying diversity and debate within the tradition."

  • Book

by Michael A. Cook

"The Koran has constituted a remarkably resilient core of identity and continuity for a religious tradition that is now in its fifteenth century. In this Very Short Introduction, Michael Cook provides a lucid and direct account of the significance of the Koran both in the modern world and in that of traditional Islam."

  • Video

Here and Now from PBS

"A pre-recorded talk with Asifa Quaishi-Landes, a UW-Madison professor of U.S. constitutional law and Islamic law. Even as an expert in both fields, she spends a lot time educating people on what Islamic law is - and is not."

  • Article

by Haroon Moghul

Time Magazine

February 26, 2016

"Islamophobia is like racism not because Islam is a race, but because, for the Islamophobe, 'Islam' plays the same role 'race' did for racists. It’s all about broad, sweeping, malicious judgments."

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